All rights reserved. Second edition of "Hasselblad Compendium" released, Calculator added to equivalent focal length section, 'Equivalent' 35 mm format (24x36 mm) focal lengths, News about Hasselblad Historical - RSS feed. 50mm being slightly less than 80mm and slightly more than 75mm in medium format terms using the first method. 4x5 6x12 . 645,6x6(hassblad) and 6x7 are all medium format but will have different ratios. https://petapixel.com/2014/12/18/comparing-image-quality-film-digital More-or-less: not quite an average of all of the above, but a reasonable fit that's close enough on both 6x6 and 6x4.5 to a 35mm focal length that is actually used. Many people “move up”, as they say, from a 35mm camera to Medium Format, to obtain better quality than they have experienced with their 35mm SLR. In other words, a 100mm lens on 645 sees about the same angle of view as a 60mm lens does on 35mm film.. The one I am reviewing will be with the 75mm (approximately 45mm in 35mm equivalent) lens. IF YOU DO IT THAT WAY ! 5x7 6x17. The frame number for this format is printed at the bottom of the frame. Also called 6x6, 2-1/4 x 2-1/4" or simply "Two and a Quarter." Using the second method which fits the paper better anyway changes the situation making 90mm the equivalent focal length of a 50mm lens on a 35mm camera. From that you can calculate other focal lengths. being much smaller than the 6x6 format, the angles of view will be smaller too. crop an diagonally composed image in either format to the image produced by the other format. And of course, this is just 35 mm; with medium and large format you get even more detail, and the larger you keep going the possibilities keep skyrocketing. Actual . More information on the how an why of the Lens Multiplication Factor (also referred to as 'Crop Factor') can be found on Wikipedia How do the focal lengths of standard lenses for medium format cameras (75mm/80mm) compare with 40mm-58mm on 35mm cameras? I believe 100mm is considered "normal" for 6x9. For such people, the Pentacon Six is an obvious choice, with its similar layout and handling characteristics. There are other "medium format" formats - 4.5x6, 6x7, 6x9 for example. And of course, this is just 35 mm; with medium and large format you get even more detail, and the larger you keep going the possibilities keep skyrocketing. 8x10 4x10 . Using the long side angle of view the figure is 0.56. If the simple calculator doesn't suit your needs, we also offer calculators for crop factor based on sensor size and completely custom lens + sensor crop factor calculations. We can also use that crop factor to determine the 35mm-equivalent … Simply input your focal length, sensor size, and max aperture and we'll give you what the 35mm equivalent is of that configuration. Used. Now, for those who like the 35mm format in those proportions then this is a correct comparison. Again, cropping the taller frame to produce an image exactly the same as that captured in the smaller frame is focal length of (43.2mm/79.2mm * 150mm) = 82mm and an equivalent … an approximation will be the best a general comparison can achieve. https://petapixel.com/2014/12/18/comparing-image-quality-film-digital the (horizontal) equivalence is true. 6x9 . Further, if you crop the MF image to a rectangle, you will of course be reducing the angle of view. A 43mm lens on a 67 format camera gives approximately the same angle of view as a 21mm lens on a 35mm camera. not only from this nominal focal length, but also from that of other Zeiss/Hasselblad lenses having nominally 1. count lines - should give us the absolute peak resolution of the film files. 645 6x6. For example, my interest is figuring out the 35mm equivalents for the most popular large format lens sizes of 4x5, 5x7, 8x10, and 11x14. I'm looking to expand my lens collection for it, but i'm not sure what I want to grab, since there are quite a few choices in focal length and I like to visually see the differences. This ruled out TLRs. As a result, the diagonal often has to be taken as the basis for comparisons. The Mamiya 6 MF is an interchangeable lens medium format rangefinder, which will shoot 6×6 frames on both 120/220 roll film or, with the aid of optional masks, permits you to change to 6×4.5 medium format and panoramic format 35mm film. mm format focal lengths will be longer accordingly. The simple answer is any lens Full Frame or DX lens that you put on a cropped sensor camera you multiply to figure out its 35mm equivalent. 8x10 4x10 . are superimposed. vertical angles of view are equal (blue outline = 6x4.5 format). They are plentiful for 35mm, and there are some for 6x6, but I haven't been able to find any for 6x4.5. Promo Financing * Add to Cart. A subject just fitting inside the 35 mm frame horizontally will not fit inside the 6x6 frame, and conversely, a 35 format (1:1.5) differ considerably, and an answer will depend on what aspect is used in the comparison. None conform to 35mm format with the exception of the enprint size of 6 x 4 recently available for that very purpose. mmCalc is a super simple photography focal length calculator. When I was younger, I just accepted that the 75mm lens in my Rolleicord was equal to the 50mm lens in my Praktica. A digital camera would have to be 156 megapixels to give you the same kind of detail as 35mm film. Ok, what is DOF for 80mm F2.8, 400mm F2.8, 135mm F4, 500mm F5.6? If I have missed anything, please contact me and let me know. It is interesting to note that the original Nikon cameras, made just after the war, were this very size. But when it comes to 35mm the diagonal measures 43.2666153055mm – So a focal length of 45mm would be closer to the medium format standard  lens of 80mm. 35mm. Using Jim's diagonal rule you need to multiply the RB67 lens focal length by 0.48 to get the 35mm equivalent. The simple answer is any lens Full Frame or DX lens that you put on a cropped sensor camera you multiply to figure out its 35mm equivalent. 6x7cm. For example, an 180mm lens on a 4x5 camera would have an equivalent focal length of approximately 54mm in 35mm terms and for 8x10 it would be 27mm. Focal . Here's the chart: The aspect ratios of 6x6 format (1:1) and On 35mm, this angle equates to a lens of 27.27mm focal length so you can consider it similar to a 28mm lens on 35mm . And so I settled on the Mamiya RZ67. Search Within Results. The Mamiya 6 rangefinder camera was introduced in 1989 as and shoot solely 6x6 120 medium format film. So, if you multiply an 80mm lens by .55, you’ll get 44mm. 5x7 6x17. In other words, a 100mm lens on 645 sees about the same angle of view as a 60mm lens does on 35mm film.. I also wasn't a big fan of the 5 blade straight aperture of the Hasselblad V lenses. The equivalent 35 Regarding exposure, nothing changes; f/2.8 is f/2.8. More-or-less: not quite an average of all of the above, but a reasonable fit that's close enough on both 6x6 and 6x4.5 to a 35mm focal length that is actually used. the same focal length. Even this is not quite right as the 35mm format has a ratio of 1:1.5 whilst 645 is about 1:1.35. If I have missed anything, please contact me and let me know. A 43mm lens on a 67 format camera gives approximately the same angle of view as a 21mm lens on a 35mm camera. A 2x tele = 80mm x 2 = 160mm, then round to the nearest lens = 150mm. mmCalc is a super simple photography focal length calculator. focal length of (43.2mm/79.2mm * 150mm) = 82mm and an equivalent … More on all that a bit later. We’ll be limiting ourselves to the digital domain which means scanning but we’ll use a microscope to see how much detail there is actually on the film itself for those who might want to use the analog darkroom. Angle of View Chart . It is often asked, perhaps because there is no single answer. (the square root of 24 squared + 36 squared). Or where and how can I calculate DOF for medium format? This feature is very useful, effectively making two great cameras in one. The aspect ratios of 6x6 format (1:1) and 35 format (1:1.5) differ considerably, and an answer will depend on what aspect is used in the comparison. ... in proportion to the format sizes. Copyright 2009 - Q.G. The calculator is compatible with all the standard film formats such as 6x4.5, 6x6 and 6x7 etc. The 6x9 film gate size used for the calculations was 2.25 x 3.25 inches. Click here for an online calculator, comparing the angles of view for a number of popular formats. ... 35 mm back to top of page. Framing in both formats is equivalent only in the rare case that subjects have to be framed diagonally. The 35mm equivalent lens is shown for reference. 11x14 ... APS was the 1990's equivalent of the Disc and Instamatic (126 and 110) formats. Here's the chart: So the calculation now alters as the diagonal of a 32mm x 24mm is exactly 40mm. 2. compare results on screen - good for pixel peepers 3. compare prints and projected pictures - actually gives useful information for the photographer From this you can see that 80mm is roughly equal to a touch over 50mm in 35mm terms, which is probably how the factory arrived at these focal lengths. an 80mm lens on a MF FF would be the focal length equivalent of a 45mm lens on a 35mm FF sensor. You can compare the focal lengths of 6 x 6 and 35mm by: Leaving the formats as they are. 645 film (56 x 41.5mm) has 2.6 times the area of full-frame 35mm (36 x 24mm), or a 0.62075x crop factor.. Perhaps that is why the famous Rollei 35 series had a 40mm lens ! If you know that 50mm is “normal” and that, say, 90mm is a “portrait” field of view in the 35mm (Film/DSLR) world, then what you need to know is these focal lengths yield different fields of view in the medium format world. 645 6x6. To keep the table simple, the choice was made to use the nominal focal lengths instead of the true focal Actual . If you have the kit 18-55 on a nikon you multiply it by 1.5x which is 27-82.5mm in its 35mm equivalent. 8 x 10 needs only 30 x 24 as does 16 x 20. From the diagonal of a film format can be easily calculated. If you know that 50mm is “normal” and that, say, 90mm is a “portrait” field of view in the 35mm (Film/DSLR) world, then what you need to know is these focal lengths yield different fields of view in the medium format world. Let’s look at leaving the formats as they are. (24 x 24) + (36 x 36) and find the square root of the answer. This film type is often confused with standard 35mm without careful inspection because of its 35mm width. We’ll be limiting ourselves to the digital domain which means scanning but we’ll use a microscope to see how much detail there is actually on the film itself for those who might want to use the analog darkroom. The difference in the aspect ratios of 35 mm format and 6x4.5 format is small. Actual image size 56 x 56 mm. The 35mm equivalents of those two focal lengths on a 6x6 camera would be 35mm and approx 80mm. The theoretical focal length of a Zeiss (Kyocera/Contax) 50mm f1.7 is actually 51.9mm making 51.64mm even closer to 90mm in medium format terms. A 35mm lens on a 67 format camera is probably a little wider than a 19mm equivalent in a 35mm camera. For example, a 6×6 camera has a crop factor of .55. You can compare the focal lengths of 6 x 6 and 35mm by: Let’s look at leaving the formats as they are.
2020 6x6 equivalent 35mm